PAYPAL CAUSES DISTRESS BY TELLING A DECEASED CUSTOMER HER DEATH IS A BREACH OF ITS RULES

Google-owned PayPal PayPal has been forced to apologise after it sent a letter to Lindsay Durdle, who passed away from breast cancer aged just 37, claiming her death breached its credit rules.

Following her death, her husband, Howard Durdle informed the organisation and provided copies of her death certificate, will and his ID. Despite this the tech giant sent out a number of default notices, causing upset to her family left behind.

Mr Durdle contacted the BBC to raise awareness about how distressing such messages could be and hopes that companies will learn from his tragic experience.

As a member of the charity Widowed and Young, he has seen first-hand how such communications can completely derail grieving families. Howard believes it is important that organisations put processes into place to stop the damage they can cause the recently bereaved and is campaigning for tighter controls.

Wilmington Millennium offers a number of solutions such as Mortascreen and Halo. Mortascreen enables organisations to screen their active customer databases for recent deaths safeguarding it against such insensitive communications. Not only will this mean that no further upset is experienced by the deceased’s family it also protects the brand against the significant brand damage associated with such practices. Whilst Halo reduces deceased identity fraud by flagging deceased customers or identifying applications made in the names of people that have died.

For further information on how to protect your business against making such distressing errors contact us on: 01274 53 88 21